Meet the 2019 Global Bupa Nurse Scholars

31 July 2019 . International

Five Bupa nurses have received Global Bupa Nurse Scholarships worth £10,000 to fund their professional, education and development goals. A key part of the scholarship is leading a clinical improvement project. We caught up with them to find out more about the projects they will be focusing on during their scholarships.

Amnah Ahmad Alharthi is a dedicated nurse at My Clinic, owned by our partners Nazer Group in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. She is a specialist in neurological and musculoskeletal conditions.

“We don’t yet have a cure for multiple sclerosis (MS) but the more we learn about it, the better we can treat it.

In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, approximately one in every 5,000 people will be diagnosed with MS – and the number is increasing – but there isn’t a specialised MS centre anywhere in our region.

I want to change that by creating a multidisciplinary care centre to improve the everyday lives of people living with MS. We will offer life-changing treatment, as well as raise public awareness of this debilitating disease. I see it as a centre of excellence that will attract patients from around the Kingdom and bring together primary care specialists including neurologists, radiologists, psychologists, urologists, pharmacists and physiotherapists.”

Emma Stephens left the NHS after 12 years to join Bupa Global as a nurse advisor supporting the claims team. She has advised teams in Brighton and Egypt, as well as volunteered her skills setting up health clinics in Kenya. 

“I’ll never forget the heart-breaking feeling when I know our members are informed that Bupa can’t fund their preferred chemotherapy treatment, as it’s considered experimental. This inspired me to begin to examine the whole process of how we manage experimental oncology claims.

We can’t fund experimental cancer treatments, but there are many other ways we can support our members during this exceptionally difficult time in their lives. The first is to ensure we have a consistent, proactive and holistic approach to how we respond to requests for experimental treatment. We must care for the whole person – mind and body – to achieve optimal health and wellbeing for our members.

Throughout the programme, I’ll be learning from senior leaders how to influence real change that will improve many people’s lives.”

Jennifer Law has led many successful projects as a Corporate Lead Clinician at Bupa UK Insurance, from developing market-leading assisted fertility propositions to clinical audit programmes.

“I’ve led many diverse projects during my eight years as a corporate lead clinician for Bupa UK Insurance, but I believe that reviewing high-cost claim management is one of the most important. If we can’t effectively manage these types of claims, we won’t be able to sustain our business performance and growth – and that’s a big problem.

Finding ways to better understand and manage our highest area of spending benefits everyone.

I’ll be meeting with clinicians around the world and drilling into the details of what we do well and how we can do better. I’ll also be examining our current high-cost claims management processes, the ways we measure outcomes, and if we can achieve more with digital innovation.”

Olga Wróbel’s accomplishments as a registered nurse at LUXMED in Krakow range from launching new surgical services to developing programmes for post-graduate interns.

“For children living with lower urinary tract dysfunction, worry and embarrassment can be overwhelming and affect their confidence and social interactions.

Urinary tract dysfunction is an issue that affects many children and yet therapy isn’t widely available in Poland.

I want to create a specialist urology clinic to treat lower urinary tract dysfunction with behavioural therapy. No surgery, specialist equipment or drugs required: after appropriate training, we can offer this in-demand treatment with the resources we already have.”

Sergio Castaño Jimenez is a paediatric and surgical nurse. His work setting up a specialist diabetes clinic at Sanitas’ La Moraleja Hospital in Madrid and reducing insulin dependence through dietary education is saving lives.

“As nurses, we’re always telling people about the benefits of a healthy diet, but ‘healthy’ doesn’t always describe a plate of hospital food. 

I want to see plates of hospital food filled with the right proportion of proteins, carbohydrates and healthy fats, and free of ultra-processed sugars, refined flours and saturated fats.

My idea to create a truly healthy hospital developed during my time as a diabetes educator. I saw how my diabetes patients could stop needing insulin if they eliminated sugar, ultra-processed foods and saturated fats from their diet. We need to show people – not just tell them – what a healthy diet looks like.”


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